Sessions American No. 2 Mantel Clock

RS Sessions Mission Oak (3)
An attractive Sessions mantel clock

This is a recently acquired Sessions time and strike mission style mantel clock. Aside from cleaning up the case with diluted Murphy’s Soap, my standard cleaner for clock cases, I applied clock oil to the movement and reset the verge in order to get the proper beat. It is running well and keeps very good time. There is a  speed adjuster at the 12 o’clock position which is helpful in regulating the speed.

RS Sessions Mission Oak mantel clock (7)
Sessions time and strike movement

There are some issues, the glass clips are broken and the glass is loose in it’s bezel but putty will fix that. It came without a double-sided key but I have enough spares that I have one that fits and the clock needs a thorough cleaning.

RS Sessions Mission Oak mantel clock (3)
Before bezel is cleaned

After it is running for a week or so, I will tear it down and address any bushing issues.

This is an “American No. 2” Sessions  mantel clock from 1921 according to Tran Duy Ly’s book on Sessions clocks, page 121.


2 thoughts on “Sessions American No. 2 Mantel Clock

  1. Hello, I have a clock identical to the one in your picture my wife’s dad gave her. It belonged to my wife’s great aunt. It has writing in pencil on the label on the back saying it was sold on 1/14/21. I thought it was very interesting the excerpt from the book said it was an American Number 2 from 1921. It didn’t want to stay running so I took the clock mechanism out and cleaned it and then set the beat on it. Now it runs good. I’ve had to adjust the regulator on it but it runs good. It’s also in good condition. Thank you for your post. It’s good knowing it’s a missions style mantle clock. Thanks again. Gary

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    1. Thanks for your comment Gary. There was also a number one version that had plain as opposed to fluted sides like the number 2. They are very good runners but suffer from having poorly designed clicks. You can hear the click when you wind your clock. If yours ever fails, and it may not, it would be because one of the clicks would let go and sometimes take gears and teeth with it.

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