In Flanders Fields, the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.
John McCrae

Today is a day of remembrance. Exactly 100 years after the end of World War, at the 11th hour on the 11th day of the 11th month on Sunday, Canadians will observe two minutes of silence — as they do every year on this date — to remember soldiers (and other military personnel) who lost their lives in this war and other conflicts.

People wear artificial poppies on their clothes in the weeks leading up to Remembrance Day. Red poppies symbolize the memory of those who died. On November 11, special church services are organized. These often include the playing of “The Last Post”, a reading of the fourth verse of the ‘Ode of Remembrance’ and two minutes silence at 11:00am. After the service, wreaths are laid at local war memorials.

National War Memorial, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
National War Memorial, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

The official Canadian national ceremonies are held at the National War Memorial in Ottawa. A service is held and wreaths are laid by armed services representatives. In May 2000 the remains of a Canadian soldier who died in France in World War I, but was never been identified, were laid in the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at the National War Memorial.

Parliament Buildings in Ottawa
Peace Tower, Parliament Buildings, Ottawa

Take a moment to remember those who made the ultimate sacrifice to protect our freedoms.